For the latest amateur classical music listings in and around Portsmouth, including Fareham, Petersfield, Chichester, Havant and Hayling Island

Matthew Hunt & Friends launch 2019 Chichester Chamber Concerts series

Matthew Hunt & Friends offer the January entertainment in the Chichester Chamber Concerts series.

Thursday, January 24 will bring together Matthew Hunt (clarinet), Alina Ibragimova (violin), Louise Hopkins (cello) and Alasdair Beatson (piano) in The Assembly Room in the Chichester Council House in North Street.

Their programme will be Debussy – Première Rhapsodie for clarinet and piano; Ravel – Piano Trio; and Messiaen – Quartet for the End of Time. Matthew, solo clarinettist with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen and a member of Sheffield-based Ensemble 360, admits it’s quite a programme.

Read more at: https://www.chichester.co.uk/whats-on/music/matthew-hunt-friends-launch-2019-chichester-chamber-concerts-series-1-8768102

Visit the concert page.


Portsmouth Chamber Music Series features Ensemble 360

Ensemble 360 is performing in Portsmouth Guildhall on Monday 28 January at 7.30pm.

Ensemble 360 is the resident ensemble of Music in the Round, who play in a variety of combinations up to eleven musicians in total, allowing the possibility of programming interesting works which are rarely heard. This concert is a good example, featuring sextets which were composed just two years apart, and yet with sound-worlds which could not be more different. Indeed the Dohnányi is far more similar in style to Brahms, and this is a work that truly merits the label of ‘unjustly neglected masterpiece’. The Brahms, on the other hand, needs no introduction as this is perhaps the most famous of all his chamber works.

“The clarinettist [Matthew Hunt] played so beautifully it was as though he wished to make the very air of the hall melt.” – Tokyo Times

Whatever your motivation might be, the Portsmouth Chamber Music Series is supported by the University of Portsmouth in partnership with the Portsmouth Cultural Trust, Music in the Round and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, to bring internationally renowned musicians to local audiences and enhance the cultural offering of the city.

Tickets are £18 (£16 concessions) and available through the Guildhall’s box office. For questions about the Portsmouth Chamber Music Series, contact Colin Jagger, Director of Music at the University of Portsmouth on 023 9284 3023 (music@port.ac.uk).


What’s better than the sound of the cello?

Stella Scott writes:

What’s better than the sound of the cello?

The sound of two cellos, of course!

Cellists love to get together to play music in groups, the most famous example being the 12 Cellists of the Berlin Philharmonic who perform a huge variety of music and tour all over the world. Hampshire cellists Amanda Berry and Stella Scott will join forces with Stella’s pianist husband, Jonathan, on January 27th for a concert of music for just two cellos. They will play music ranging from Vivaldi to Morricone and Shostakovich – all wonderfully melodious and delightful to listen to!

The concert will take place at 3.00 pm at St Faith’s Church in Havant. Entrance is free but there will be a retiring collection in aid of the Church’s ‘Big Build’ fund which supports the ongoing excellent renovations to the Pallant Centre, St Faith’s community hall complex just up the road from the Church. Amanda, Stella and Jonathan are all members of the Havant Orchestras who enjoy rehearsing at the Pallant Centre on a regular basis. Amanda also performs with Petersfield Orchestra and recently appeared at St Faith’s as one-third of the Kalore Piano Trio.

Their message to music fans: “We’re very excited to be playing such gorgeous music together, and do hope people will come along to hear something a little bit different!”


Music Appreciation Course at New Park Centre – January 2019

Angela Zanders’ popular Chichester Music Circle classes in music appreciation are due to begin again with a new course at the New Park Centre in Chichester, starting on Monday 21st January.

‘Images in Music’ is the theme and each week Angela will explore some of the music inspired by such images as fire, weather, the moon and the sea. She will use PowerPoint slides and video examples of the music, as well as demonstrating at the piano.

Angela, who is a concert pianist and lecturer at Chichester University, has been running music appreciation classes for more than 25 years. She has a special interest in helping those who enjoy listening to classical music but who have little knowledge of the subject, to widen their understanding and enjoyment of it. “I do believe that classical music is for everyone and there is always so much wonderful music to discover. It is so fascinating trying to find out what aspects of life inspired composers to write great music and how they expressed their inspiration in notes.”

The classes are suitable for those who have some knowledge of classical music, but they are also aimed at those who enjoy listening to music but have no technical knowledge at all. There are 8 sessions which take place on Mondays 1.30pm – 3.30pm with a break for tea/coffee.

The cost of the course is £72. For more information, and to enrol, please contact Angela before the first session on 21st January on tel: 07582 537123 or via zanders@hotmail.co.uk.


Portsmouth Festival Choir: New Year, New Maestro, New Music

Portsmouth Festival Choir will be starting rehearsals for its next concert, this coming Monday 7th January.

Its new conductor, Ben Lathbury, has devised an unusual and interesting concert for its next performance, which will take place at the Church of the Holy Spirit in Fawcett Road on Saturday 16th March.

The major work will be the Solemn Mass by French composer Vierne. This was written to be accompanied by two pipe organs. However, on the advice of his teacher Widor, Vierne adapted his work for one organ. The organ will be played on this occasion by brilliant local organist Mark Dancer, who is also the Festival Choir’s assistant musical director. The beautiful organ at the Church of the Holy Spirit will be perfect for this exciting work.

In addition the concert will feature several works by Charles Villiers Stanford: his Three Motets, the soaringly beautiful Blue Bird, and a very dramatic piece Lo I Raise Up. In similar vein is Haydn’s A crazed and hopeless passion invades our minds.

The choir is much looking forward to learning and practising this innovative programme of music.

New members are always welcome to come along and give the choir a try. It meets at Portsmouth Academy in St Mary’s Road, Fratton PO1 5PF every Monday from 7 p.m. to 9.15. Music is provided on loan.

For more information see www.portsmouthfestivalchoir.co.uk.

Pictured: Ben Lathbury and Mark Dancer, conductor and organist.


Chichester Chamber Concerts launch latest season

Presenting its 14th season in 13 years, Chichester Chamber Concerts will be offering something genuinely special over the autumn and into the spring.

The season offers a concert a month at the Assembly Room, North Street, Chichester on Thursdays at 7.30pm, running from October through to March.

Read more at: https://www.chichester.co.uk/whats-on/music/chichester-chamber-concerts-launch-latest-season-1-8644837

Visit https://www.chichesterchamberconcerts.com for further details of the concerts. The next one is on Thursday 24 January at 7.30pm with: Matthew Hunt: clarinet, Alina Ibragimova: violin, Louise Hopkins: cello and Alasdair Beatson: piano playing Debussy, Ravel and Messiaen’s profound Quartet for the End of Time.

Read a review of the Merlin Ensemble concert in November.


Portsmouth Chamber Music Series announces new season

Now in its fifteenth season, the Portsmouth Chamber Music Series brings world-class musicians to the city. In partnership with Music in the Round and the Portsmouth Cultural Trust, we present the finest music in informal surroundings where you are never more than a few metres from the performers. Q and A sessions follow each concert, and a 20% discount is available to those who book the whole series.

Tickets available from the Portsmouth Guildhall: 023 9387 0211

For further information or to join our mailing list, please contact music@port.ac.uk or 023 9284 3023

£18 full price, £16 concessions: book all six concerts and get a 20% discount, so £86.40 for the whole season (£76.80 concs). Student-standby tickets are available from 7pm on the day of each concert, for £6. Prices include booking fee and restoration levy.

All concerts start at 7.30pm in the Portsmouth Guildhall: seating is unreserved, with doors open from 7pm.

Monday 8 October, 2018, 7.30pm   Read a review

Goldmund Quartet

Florian Schötz & Pinchas Adt violins, Christoph Vandory viola, Raphael Paratore cello

HAYDN String Quartet in D, Op. 76 No. 5

SHOSTAKOVICH String Quartet No. 3 in F, Op. 73

BEETHOVEN String Quartet in E minor, Op. 59 No. 2

Rising stars from Germany, the Goldmund play with enormous flair and commitment to the music. The programme includes pieces by three of the greatest composers of string quartets. Haydn’s example is from his late great Op. 76 set, while the Shostakovich is the third of fifteen. That does not make it an early work, however, as he had already composed nine symphonies, and this quartet is a masterpiece in its own right. The Beethoven is the second of the three Rasumovsky quartets, a set which sees the composer moving away from the ‘classical’ style towards the truly unique style of his later works.

“The Goldmunds make a beautiful sound, elegant and transparent, with a real sense that these four players are friends both on and off the concert platform.” – Gramophone Magazine, Jan. 2017

Post-concert Q&A

 

Monday 5 November, 2018, 7.30pm   Read more

Steven Osborne 

POULENC 3 Novelettes

DEBUSSY Images Book II

PROKOFIEV Piano Sonata No. 7

SCHUBERT Sonata in B-flat, D. 960

Steven Osborne’s insightful and idiomatic interpretations have made him one of the most highly regarded pianists in the world. His numerous awards include The Royal Philharmonic Society Instrumentalist of the Year (2013) and two Gramophone Awards. This programme shows him at his finest, with wonderful sets of miniatures by Poulenc and Debussy contrasted with a highly dramatic sonata by Prokofiev, and then perhaps the finest of all piano sonatas, Schubert’s last.

“Some pianists gild everything they touch with their own personality; some are like chameleons, finding a new colour for each composer. Last night the wonderful Scottish pianist Steven Osborne did both, which lent the whole evening a miraculous air…every note seemed to vibrate with intelligence.” – The Daily Telegraph, Feb. 2016

Post-concert Q&A

  

Monday 28 January, 2019, 7.30pm  Read more

Ensemble 360

Benjamin Nabarro & Claudia Ajmone-Marsan violins, Ruth Gibson viola, Gemma Rosefield cello, Matthew Hunt clarinet, Naomi Atherton horn, Tim Horton piano

DOHNÁNYI Sextet in C, Op. 37

COPLAND Sextet

BRAHMS Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115

Ensemble 360 is the resident ensemble of Music in the Round, who play in a variety of combinations up to eleven musicians in total, allowing the possibility of programming interesting works which are rarely heard. This concert is a good example, featuring sextets which were composed just two years apart, and yet with sound-worlds which could not be more different. Indeed the Dohnányi is far more similar in style to Brahms, and this is a work that truly merits the label of ‘unjustly neglected masterpiece’. The Brahms on the other hand needs no introduction as this is perhaps the most famous of all his chamber works.

“The clarinettist [Matthew Hunt] played so beautifully it was as though he wished to make the very air of the hall melt.” – Tokyo Times

Post-concert Q&A

 

Monday 25 March, 2019, 7.30pm

Trio Isimsiz

Erdem Misirlioglu piano, Pablo Hernán Benedí violin, Michael Petrov cello

MOZART Divertimento in B-flat, K. 254

FAURÉ Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 120

BEETHOVEN Piano Trio in E-flat, Op. 70 No. 2

Formed in 2009 at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, the Trio Isimsiz won 1st Prize and the Audience Prize at the Trondheim Competition in 2015. They combine great unanimity of ensemble with lots of individuality of character. Mozart’s delightful first piano trio is contrasted with one of Fauré’s last works, composed when he was 78. Beethoven’s Op. 70 No. 2 is the companion piece to the more famous ‘Ghost’ Trio, but, as Beethoven once remarked in connection with two of his symphonies, it might be less popular ‘because it is so much better’!

“An outstanding debut disc by the Trio Isimsiz whose unusually thoughtful interpretations are presented with dazzling technical mastery” – Gramophone Magazine, March 2018

Post-concert Q&A

 

Monday 29 April, 2019, 7.30pm

Piatti Quartet

Nathaniel Anderson-Frank & Michael Trainor violins, Tetsuumi Nagata viola, Jessie Ann Richardson cello

HAYDN Quartet in D, Op. 20 No. 4

JOSEPH PHIBBS String Quartet No. 1

SCHUBERT Quartet in G, D. 887

We are delighted to welcome back the Piatti Quartet who gave such a memorable performance two years ago with Krzysztof Chorzelski of the Belcea Quartet. This time they present a quartet from the first set by Haydn regarded as ‘mature’. Indeed it is a fabulous set and No. 4 is one of the strongest. The Schubert quartet dates from towards the end of his life, and, like the piano sonata programmed earlier in the season, is a towering pillar of the repertoire. Joseph Phibbs has rapidly made a name for himself with orchestral works premiered by conductors such as Esa-Pekka Salonen, Leonard Slatkin, and Vassily Petrenko. The Belcea Quartet has recently commissioned a third quartet from him, and No. 1 was commissioned by the Piatti, and premiered by them in 2015.

“The Phibbs proved formally exhilarating yet plangent in its combination of vibrancy and formal rigour.” – The Sunday Times, May 2015

Post-concert Q&A

 

Monday 20 May, 2019, 7.30pm

Ensemble 360

Tim Horton piano, Benjamin Nabarro violin, Ruth Gibson viola, Gemma Rosefield cello

MAHLER Piano Quartet in A minor

STRAUSS Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 13

BRAHMS Piano Quartet in A, Op. 26

Mahler and Richard Strauss may be household names to orchestra-goers, but they are almost unknown for their chamber music. Mahler’s haunting single movement was composed during his late-teens, while Strauss’ full-length work in four movements dates from 1884 when he was 20. It is a wonderful piece full of hints of what was to come in the magnificent series of tone poems the first of which was premiered just two years later. Brahms’ quartet on the other hand is a fully mature piece is in his most energetic and entertaining style.

“…one immediately felt in the presence of players who embraced them with affectionate abandon – and had the skill to bring it off.” – BBC Music Magazine

Post-concert Q&A


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