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Chichester Music Society: David Owen Norris: ‘A path of his own discovery’: Beethoven at the piano

Wed 9 Dec 2020 7:30pm, Chapel of the Ascension, Bishop Otter Campus, University of Chichester

David Owen Norris is a pianist, composer and broadcaster. He won the Prize of the City of Geneva in the Geneva Competition, and the Accompanist’s Prize at Leeds; and since his appointment to the prestigious Gilmore Artist Award, has performed all across the world, with four appearances in the BBC Proms, concert tours of Europe, Australia and North America, including performances at Sydney Opera House, the Kennedy Centre, Lincoln Centre, Ravinia Festival Chicago, the South Bank Centre etc. and a discography of 60 commercial CDs including his own Piano Concerto with the BBC Concert Orchestra, and his oratorio Prayerbook. His other compositions include a Symphony, a Piano Sonata, the oratorio Turning Points, and the multi-media tribute to the passing seasons, HengeMusic.

His Chord of the Week programmes on BBC2 television were a popular feature of the Proms for six years. His Perfect Pianists is often shown on BBC4. He has contributed to programmes on Parry, Vaughan Williams, Mendelssohn & Elgar, including ninety minutes on BBC2 dedicated to Elgar’s Piano Concerto, with a full, filmed performance with the BBCSO. His first TV presentation, The Real Thing? from 1990, was hailed by the Daily Telegraph as ‘the most literate and probing programme on music for many years’, and his most recent Chord of the Week was reviewed by the Observer as ‘the most consistently intelligent three minutes you’ll watch on this or any other television this year’. The Beethoven 9 app for which he wrote the book and the analyses won the Best Music App Award.

His many radio presentations have included the Playlist series on Radio 4, and In Tune and The Works on radio 3, where he made his 28th appearance on Building a Library last December. Recordings recently released include Mozart on fortepiano for Hyperion, featured in the New York Times, and the complete Chamber Music of Grace Williams, which was a Guardian CD of the Week. He will shortly conclude his complete survey of Sir Arthur Sullivan’s songs on Chandos.

In this evening’s lecture/recital David Owen Norris begins by tracing the development of Beethoven’s stylistic traits from the variations: triple-time Adagios, such a metrical minefield for performers throughout his work; the ridiculous jokes, the baffling dynamic shifts, the exploitation of each end of the keyboard, even the boldness of tonality – all is here in embryo.

He then turns his attention to Beethoven’s two most remarkable sonatas composed before deafness put an end to his performing career: the Sonate Pathétique, Op. 13 (1799) and the Fantasy-Sonata Op.27 No.2 (1802 – the Moonlight Sonata). Op.13 shows us how Beethoven’s pianism came out of his harpsichord playing – the first edition describes it as being ‘for harpsichord or pianoforte’, and Beethoven arranged many of its details with that in mind. The Moonlight, from the same year as the Heiligenstadt Testament, Beethoven’s open letter of despair to the world, can be read as a personal response to the onset of deafness – it is dedicated to the pupil he had hitherto hoped to marry.


Festival of Chichester annual public meeting switches to Zoom

Organisers of the Festival of Chichester are setting the ball rolling for next year with their annual public meeting.

The plan is for a Zoom meeting on Tuesday, November 17, beginning at 7pm. Drop us an email to infochifest@gmail.com to receive details on how to confirm your attendance.

Read more at the link below.


Profile: Susan Yarnall-Monks, soprano, lecturer and voice coach

Who and/or what have been the most important influences on your musical career?

My parents and various teachers were wonderfully supportive – they wouldn’t let me give up till I had got my grade 8 and by then of course I didn’t want to – but it was various performances that made me consider taking up music as a career. While at school I played the part of Susanna in The Marriage of Figaro, which was hugely challenging but which left me with a love of Mozart. My piano teacher got me into singing but my parents only found out that I had a talent for it when I surprised them by winning a local Eisteddfod!

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

For any woman who wants to combine a professional career with bringing up a family, there will always be sacrifices and compromises to make. I’m not complaining, as I have a wonderful family and have had a wonderful career.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

One of the main challenges is trying to achieve a high quality of music-making in a concert if fellow musicians are stressed or nervous. Quite by contrast, rehearsals are a pleasure, where one can work on different interpretations of the work in a generally more relaxed atmosphere.

I teach on the BMus Vocal Performance degree at Chichester University. I like to give my students the challenge of singing in different languages, in particular French, German and Italian. Last year my students’ repertoire extended to works in Dutch, Finnish, Polish, Swedish and Welsh, which was a challenge for me and them at times!

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I have an eclectic musical taste and refuse to be ‘put in a box!’ I love Mozart, Howells, French Romantic composers and Poulenc in particular, but also Scottish songs for Burns night and works by Gershwin.

Which works do you think you perform best?

Art songs, which are miniature narratives capable of picture painting. Oratorio, Opera and Renaissance music.

Which performances are you most proud of?

Singing Fauré’s Requiem, Brahms Requiem and Carmina Burana with the Southampton Choral Society, and Poulenc’s Gloria and Mozart’s Requiem with the Renaissance Choir, because I felt all the musicians were as one with the music.

What are your most memorable concert experiences?

When I visited Berlin last year, I was able to attend Daniel Barenboim’s final concert with the Berlin Phil, an incredibly moving performance from a man who has given so much to the musical life of the world. Richard Goode used to perform regularly at Bath Music Festival: he was able to extract so many colours from the piano, you could hardly believe that he was actually playing just one instrument! Also memorable was Eugene Onegin with Susan Chilcott and Thomas Hampson at the Bastille Opera in Paris because I was introduced to Tom afterwards when we were enjoying a post-performance supper and…because the singing was so electrifying.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Be flexible and adaptable, remain creative and willing to explore. It’s a tough world out there. Get to know (and perform) music that many people don’t know; there is a lot of good contemporary music around at the moment, and you will get noticed that way. One favourite of mine at the moment is Michael Nyman’s If, with words based on Anne Frank’s diary, because it so poignant and deceptively simple.

How would you define success as a musician?

In my opinion success can be defined by whether you’ve been able to communicate a shared moment. The pianist Malcolm Martineau once spoke about the magic triangle of singer, pianist and audience and the real connection that worked between all three at a masterclass many years ago, and last year heard I him accompanying the soprano Anne Schwanewilms at Wigmore Hall when this was very evident.

Come and hear some of my students sing!

On Tuesday 17 November there will be an English Song Concert given by the University’s B.Mus Vocal Performance degree singers at the University, which will be live-streamed.

Such students need all the help they can get. I am optimistic, though, as although the delivery of musical performance may alter, musicians have shown great adaptability in the current crisis.

Susan Yarnall-Monks is an Associate Lecturer and Vocal Tutor at the University of Chichester Conservatoire. She is a professional soprano and she also enjoys singing with the Renaissance Choir where she is a frequent soloist. She has sung at Carnegie Hall in Dunfermline and in New York as well as European tours of France, Poland, Spain and Italy. Her love of French and English song has led to many recitals and recordings.

She was awarded her PhD (2007) from Sheffield University for her research into the Perception of the Singing Voice. She taught Singing and Music at Kingswood School, Bath for many years and recently retired from teaching voice at St. Paul’s Girls School, London. Susan took part in the Master Teachers Week at Princeton University USA. She is currently President of the European Vocational Training Association (EVTA) which involves organising international conferences for singing teachers from around the world.

She continues to teach singers of all ages and abilities and enjoys the challenge of helping anyone find their voice. She is a Licensed Lay Reader and also runs the Birdham Village Choir, and enjoys sailing, gardening and embroidery.

For her musings, see her blog at https://singunique.com. To view her more than 100 daily video singing exercises, visit The Renaissance Choir’s YouTube channel.

 


Plans for the Festival of Chichester 2021

We are looking forward to the 2021 Festival of Chichester, which will run between 12 June and 11 July, and are hoping to be able to return to a lively, eclectic programme of arts events.

It was such a disappointment to be forced to cancel the fantastic plans we had lined up for the 2020 live festival, but we’ve been very pleased with the positive responses to our Virtual Festival, which helped us keep the festival flag flying and stay in touch with our loyal audiences. Now it’s time to start planning for the next festival.

Because of the current uncertainty, the festival committee feels we have to keep our options open to see how the situation develops. We are therefore postponing entries from the usual November to end of January time frame to a month-long entry window in January, which will now be open from 1 to 31 January. We are also developing a new online entry system designed to streamline the process. We will keep you updated with this as work progresses.

This year our usual autumn public meeting will have to be a virtual one. The plan is for a Zoom meeting on Tuesday 17 November, beginning at 7pm, when we can update you with news of what the plans are for 2021 and of course hear all your helpful feedback, suggestions and advice. This meeting is open to anyone to attend and speak. Please email infochifest@gmail.com if you would like to receive the Zoom link.

If the national situation means we won’t be able to progress to a full live festival in 2021, we’ll be planning for a new kind of online festival, perhaps also including some open-air events or socially distanced gatherings, depending on the rules applicable at the time. We are very grateful for the fantastic support we’ve had from our organisers and audience members. You deserve a great festival and we will do all we can to provide the best festival the times will allow.


“Beethoven the Revolutionary” with Angela Zanders

This year we are celebrating the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth and I shall be giving a lecture-recital on ‘Beethoven the Revolutionary’ on 14th October at 7.30pm for the Chichester Music Society, held at the Chapel of the Ascension, Chichester University.

The event will be live-streamed so that you can watch it free of charge on your PC or another device. Read more on the concert page below.

If you wish to attend, tickets must be purchased in advance – details are available on the CMS website.

 


Erin on a High Note!

Chichester Music Group welcomed back Erin Alexander [soprano] and Nick Miller [piano] on 29 September to the Society’s first “socially distanced” concert at the University of Chichester, which was also live-streamed. This was a new experience for both the performers and the audience and, given these unusual circumstances, it was an enjoyable experience for all.

This concert was entitled “On a High Note”, which tells the story of soprano Graziella Scuitti, a contemporary of Maria Callas. Erin Alexander played the Italian singer, and she expertly maintained an effective Italian accent when in role. Nick Miller was an adept interviewer and they both created a believable platform, as they developed the life of Graziella Sciutti.

Graziella Scuitti’s stage career began in 1951 as she sang the role of Elisetta, the woman in The Telephone, which Erin performed with humour and skill, and then she sang songs from the characters that became Scuitti’s celebrated favourites, which during her career she performed over a hundred times each, Susanna, Despina, Rosina and Musetta.

The audience therefore enjoyed a wide selection of arias from Bach, Mozart, Verdi, Rossini, and Puccini. Erin Alexander’s performance was engagingly dramatic, and she sang with a very self-possessed vibrancy, particularly rising to the challenge of singing in the character of another opera singer. This was an extremely rewarding performance.

The accompaniment by Nick Miller was very supportive yet so buoyant that it led to a highly effective performance by both musicians. They are to be congratulated for producing a near to perfection performance both musically, as well as in the acting necessary to make the format of the evening believable. The small audience that was allowed were very appreciative.

At the short interval the Chairman of the Chichester Music Society, Chris Hough, explained that this concert was dedicated to Chris Coote, the Society’s Treasurer, who unfortunately had just tragically died after a short illness. He said, “This was a concert that Chris Coote would have loved. He was especially committed to the development of young, gifted artists and took a keen interest in our Charity and its work. Chris had many friends in the musical world, especially in the Chichester and Bognor Regis music scene. His financial skills as an actuary, and musical temperament gave CMS an excellent treasurer. He was a talented accompanist and a fine musician. We shall miss his wit, his friendship and expertise. Erin and Nick have produced a torrent of lovely music which we have all thoroughly enjoyed. They are to be congratulated.”

Erin Alexander then closed the concert with a poignant performance of the piece when she had first met Chris Coote at a Showcase Concert Competition. This was the competition which Erin had won. She said he was one of those rare individuals who always had time for her, was always ready to provide help and advice, and as she said “he was so generous, with his time, his love, his soul, particularly for all of us young musicians, and even offered accommodation at his home when she was performing.”


The Doric Quartet set to open 2020-21 Chichester Chamber Concerts

The Doric Quartet open the 2020-21 Chichester Chamber Concerts series which will go ahead in extraordinary times (Thursday, Oct 1, 7.30pm).

Concerts will be once a month until March in the Assembly Room, but seats will be limited to approximately 40 (against a usual capacity of around 170), with tickets available from Chichester Festival Theatre. But to help accommodate the usual demand, the concerts will also be live-streamed on YouTube, with online viewers asked to make a donation.

Read more at the link below.


Soprano Erin Alexander to sing for Chichester Music Society

Chichester Music Society (formerly Funtington Music Group) welcome back Erin Alexander (soprano) with Nick Miller (piano) for a show which was to have been their first under their new name in June.

Erin and Nick will present On A High Note, the story of soprano Graziella Sciutti. The singer was a contemporary of Maria Callas and helped pioneer the movement of opera singers becoming actors. Erin will sing the arias by Mozart, Verdi, and Rossini which made Sciutti’s career.

The recital will be in Chichester University’s Chapel of the Ascension on Tuesday, September 29 at 7.30pm.

Read more at the link below.

If you click through to the concert page, you can read details about how to access the livestream of this concert.

Read a review.


Singing to return to Chichester Cathedral

The lay vicars of Chichester Cathedral will return to singing services from Sunday 13 September.

Earlier this year, the Cathedral’s choir, which is made up of six lay (adult) vicars and 14 (boy) choristers, were silenced as the country went into lockdown.

However, following guidance on singing issued by the Government and Church of England, the lay vicars will return to sing their first service at 9.30am this Sunday.

Read more at the link below.


Profile: Crispin Ward, composer, conductor, university lecturer

Who and/or what have been the most important influences on your musical career?

I grew up in a musical family; my father, now retired, was an opera singer so I pretty much know most of the major opera repertoire. I remember that when I was young I used to sneak down after bedtime and sit at the bottom step and listen to music being played on my parent’s stereo, in particular I recall Mozart’s Magic Flute, Verdi’s Requiem and Beethoven’s Fidelio.

When I went to school there was government support for music education, something sadly lacking now. There were free instrumental lessons in school and I started on a tenor horn. My teacher Graham Johnson was inspirational and he encouraged me to join all the local county bands. This opportunity is being denied our children now with only the wealthy being supported in this way.

When I was a senior at the Royal College of Music I was encouraged to take up conducting and my teacher, Christopher Adey was an absolute inspiration. I copied his style so closely my friends used to call me Little Chris.

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

There seem to be three main challenges for me. One is to try to put self-doubt behind me and ignore the negative comments from others whilst still striving to constantly improve.

The second is a lack of a clear career path: it is sometimes a challenge to decide which way to go, which direction to take, when deciding what to do next. Each concert is often a self-contained entity and each might, or might not, lead to something else. It is always difficult to know which jobs to take and which to leave alone.

The third challenge is trying to persuade people that this is the way that I, and my colleagues, make our living. Although I love my job, it is not my hobby.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

Music has taken me all over the world and introduced me to princes, presidents and celebrities. It has given me friendship and allowed me to contribute to the lives of others. One thing I have noticed about working in this field is that those musicians at the very top of the profession are almost all really very nice people.

How would you describe your musical language?

I am what some might describe as classically trained. This misnomer is a really loose term but I think it describes what I do. I am absolutely not a musical snob and I enjoy many forms of music but I am only really any good at one type. The composers with which I am most at home would be Mozart, Beethoven, Shostakovich and Weinberg. I wanted to be able to play the piano like Oscar Peterson but I really can’t, other priorities got in the way and I didn’t practice my jazz piano enough.

How do you work?

When I am composing I follow the brief. If it is a commission, what do they want? Who is the soloist and how do they play? If it is film music, then what does the director want an audience to feel at any given moment?

The actual composing is done in my head and I write the melodies and harmonies down on manuscript paper (the old fashioned way) with notes to myself as to structure, I then put it onto a computer program. I use Sibelius notation software. If the client needs to listen to it then I use a programme called Logic with a virtual orchestra from Spitfire Audio called BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

I am proud of a very few things.
I am proud of my French Horn playing in Mozart’s Magic Flute with William Christie and Les Arts Florissants.
I am really proud of the education project I developed in Moldova which tripled the salaries of the musicians whilst reaching many thousands of school children in the poorest country in Europe.
I am really pleased with my new score to the black and white silent film Battleship Potemkin which I have just finished.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

Beethoven.

Which works do you think you perform best? Why?

Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony and Shostakovich’s 5th Symphony because I am sure I understand what they are feeling.

What are your most memorable concert experiences?

I took Messiah to Chisinau (Moldova) – neither the musicians nor the audience had ever heard it before. There used to be a tradition that the audience would stand during the Hallelujah Chorus (it was said that King George stood at the first performance, as he said that he felt the presence of God, so everyone stood from then on). This tradition died out in around the 1960s. The chorus is the end of the second part (of three) and the audience in Chisinau had a translation in their programmes, however when the Hallelujah was about halfway through people started to stand up. At the end they were completely out of control, clapping and screaming, and stormed the stage. It took us a while to calm them down but at the end of the Amen chorus they erupted once again.

Also playing the French horn in Schoenberg’s Gurrelieder in Berlin with Abbado, Norman, Sukova, Langridge et al when I was 23 was simply amazing. To this day I meet people who played this concert and we all still remember it with pleasure.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Only become a professional musician if it is the ONLY thing you could imagine yourself doing. It is full time!!!

How would you define success as a musician?

I will let you know, I have yet to meet anyone who really feels as if they have truly made it.

How are you keeping yourself usefully occupied and sane under lockdown?

I am writing my PhD and am trying to improve my Russian.

What is your idea of perfect happiness?

In no particular order but combinations of…. family, beer, food, mates, the pub, walks, good music, cricket, rugby, London Irish winning/Harlequins losing (a very good day when both happen on the same day), the novels of Rex Stout.

Crispin Ward studied conducting for four years at the Royal College of Music. He has worked with many inspirational musicians such as Claudio Abbado, Zubin Meta, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Yehudi Menuhin, Mstislav Rostropovitch, Bill Christie, Leonard Bernstein, George Solti and Ravi Shankar.

For four years he gained British Foreign Office sponsorship that supported his efforts as the artistic director of the National Chamber Orchestra of Moldova. This involved conducting this, and other orchestras, in Moscow, Kiev, Odessa, Bucharest, Tver, and around the former Eastern Bloc.

Whilst working in Moldova, he instigated and sourced funding for a music education project with the orchestra. This involved over two hundred performances in schools to some 12,000 children, was backed up with considerable resources for teachers and tripled the salaries of the orchestral players. It has generated a huge interest from amongst the pupils and it receives many letters of thanks on a daily basis.

As a result of his extremely successful work in the whole sphere of Moldovan music, Crispin received the title of Om Emerit in Republica Moldova from President Vladimir Voronin. This is the highest award that a foreign national can receive and is the equivalent of a British Honorary Knighthood. Last year Mr Ward was given full Moldovan citizenship and a Moldovan passport in recognition of his continuing success in developing Moldovan musical excellence and East/West relations.

Crispin is Head of Orchestral Studies at the University of Chichester, which boasts the second-largest music department of any university in the UK.

Visit his website for further info.


Chichester Music Society: livestream of Pavlos Carvalho playing Bach Cello Suites on 9 September

Please see a previous news item about this concert.

Arrangements have been made to live stream our concert with Pavlos Carvalho on Wednesday 9th September at 7.30pm in the University Chapel.

On this occasion the live stream will be carried by the University’s in-house system, ‘Chiplayer’. Click on the link below and it will take you straight to the livestream. If you click into the link before the live stream starts you will be taken to the site and it will say “this page will refresh when the webcast starts”. The concert will begin at 7.30 pm and once you have linked onto the site, no further action is required.

https://chiplayer.cloud.panopto.eu/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=a336306d-d954-48a4-acc6-ac2f009b3f4d

I do hope that you will enjoy this live-streamed event. This will be the first time we have attempted to live stream our events so it will be a bit of a learning process all round, please bear with us!


“Discovering Women Composers” With Angela Zanders

A ten-week online music appreciation course, starting on Monday 21 or Wednesday 23 September.

Women have been composing extraordinary music throughout history, yet only now in the 21st century is much of this music being heard and appreciated for the first time.

On this course, Angela explores the stories of numerous women composers who have been forgotten by history, illustrating her talks with some of the sublime and inspiring music which deserves a valued place in the classical music repertoire.

See the poster for details and how to register.


Chichester Chamber Concerts series update

We are delighted to announce that our new season of concerts will take place in the Assembly Room starting on 1st October. The concerts will also be live-streamed by MD Music Production, directors David Greenlees and Mark Mawson.

Seats in the Assembly Room will be limited to approx. 40, so hurry to get one from Chichester Festival Theatre via https://www.cft.org.uk/chichester-chamber-concerts – tickets can be ordered online or by post (Chichester Festival Theatre, Oaklands Park, Chichester, PO19 6AP); no telephone or in-person bookings at the moment.

We will be live-streaming a rescheduled concert on 10th September by the Trinity Ensemble (seats in the hall sold out) – see CCC website for programme details – live stream tickets £9: https://www.chichesterchamberconcerts.com/trinity-10thseptember2020.

We are thrilled to be welcoming our audience back to hear wonderful musicians live in the Assembly Room, and to welcome the musicians themselves who have been deprived of their livelihood and the joy of sharing great music with their audience.

We look forward to the day when restrictions will be lifted and we can welcome everyone back to the Assembly Room.

 


Profile: Jonathan Willcocks, composer and conductor

Who and/or what have been the most important influences on your musical career?

Music was in my family from the beginning and I used to watch my father, David, conducting rehearsals. At an early age I was fascinated as he used his baton to bring in various parts – I originally thought that this was entirely to show me which instruments or singers I should watch!

My early musical training as a chorister at King’s College, Cambridge from the age of 8 to 13 has been the most important influence on my musical life and career as a composer and conductor. Life as a chorister involves full immersion for at least 4 hours a day preparing for around 8 services a week. Quite apart from the obvious superb musical foundations, other spinoffs include self-discipline and the building of self-confidence.

I’ve had the fortune of conducting some wonderful choirs and ensembles over the years. I moved to the Portsmouth area in 1975 to take up the post of Director of Music at Portsmouth Grammar School. This led to my also being appointed as conductor of the Portsmouth Choral Union and then in 1979 the Chichester Singers, I agreed to stand in at short notice to conduct a concert when Anne Lawrence, its founder, had to retire suddenly as the result of illness. Over forty years later I am still enjoying making music with them!

Again, some fortune led me into composing: I started writing music not out of any burning urge to compose but because friends at school and university asked me to. One of my earliest large-scale works was “Voices of Time” commissioned by Portsmouth Choral Union in 1980 on the occasion of its centenary, and published by OUP. This led to further commissions. You can visit my website to see a list of all the works that I have composed.

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

Every rehearsal is a challenge! Concerts work well if rehearsals do. Rehearsals lay the foundations for excellent achievement but they can be hard work, and you have to be both organised but also imaginatively flexible.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

A musical performance is very much a team effort – everyone has something potentially to offer. I get a lot of pleasure in enabling others to perform uplifting music, sometimes to a standard quite beyond what the individual may think they are capable of. That’s one reason why I particularly like working with amateur musicians.

How would you describe your musical language?

My background is in classical music written for an ecclesiastical setting. I try hard to make the piece technically match the ability of the ensemble that commissioned it and to make whatever I write challenging but accessible.

How do you work?

I sit at my desk with a pencil and manuscript, and work in shorthand. I can hear the music more clearly in my head if I don’t use the piano. I then transfer this initial draft to my computer using Sibelius software; this is very much part of the creative process, and it enables me to revisit and revise my work to develop it nearer to its completed form.

Time management skills are useful here, it has never worked for me to wait for inspiration to strike. When working on a composition I force myself to work in a disciplined way and I’ve never missed a commission deadline.

With choral compositions, I’ll start with the text. The mood and message of the words need to be mirrored in the music. With instrumental pieces there are different constraints but the music must still suit the occasion and ensemble for which it is being written.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

My interest in counterpoint means that I have a strong affinity with the music of J.S. Bach (for example his B Minor Mass), Mozart (for example his Requiem or the final movement of his Jupiter Symphony) and Elgar, who skilfully knits together various different voice parts using one rhythm. With composers like Wagner, for whom harmony is more dominant, I feel that the listener is missing a vital dimension of the subtle interrelation of voices and instruments.

Which works or performances are you most proud of?

Performing what in my opinion are the truly great masterpieces, for instance by Bach (as above), Brahms (for example his Requiem) and Britten (for example his War Requiem).

What are your most memorable concert experiences?

Conducting Dame Janet Baker in The Dream of Gerontius, and (on several occasions) Sir Willard White in Elijah and other works count among my most memorable concert experiences. Also there have been a number of instances where I have been asked to be guest conductor for what seemed like an unpromising group of players or singers, which brought unexpected joy and satisfaction in the end.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

As a former director of the Junior Academy, Royal Academy of Music in London I was always candid with students: while encouraging them to strive to fulfil their potential I would also counsel them to consider making a career out of doing something other than music, and keeping their exceptional abilities as players or singers as a lifelong amateur love, rather than trying to earn a living at it. Music is an extremely tough and competitive career, and you have to be exceptionally good at what you do but also have a lot of luck. You also need to have other attributes, you need to develop associated business skills, such as in how to market yourself effectively, and be entirely reliable. The music profession is very unforgiving of sloppy time-keeping or unreliability. For many, it may be a better idea to extract pleasure from music as a serious hobby rather than endure the uncertainty and stress of trying to earn a living from it.

How would you define success as a musician?

Feeling fulfilled and enabling others to feel fulfilled. Leading a rehearsal or a concert in which amateur musicians have achieved more than they thought that they possibly could continues to give me great satisfaction.

What are your observations about the current pandemic situation?

It’s pretty dire. There’s little or no work for professional singers and instrumentalists, many of whom are not eligible for Government support, yet they need to keep practising. Cathedral and church choirs are faced with a huge break in the continuity of choristership: they need day-in, day-out practice, and for skills to be passed on from older to younger singers. Some amateur choirs are faced with the danger of “evaporation” if they are unable to meet and rehearse in the near future. A Government may be able to stop and start the economy, but you can’t do this with music for which continuity is so vital.

About Jonathan

Jonathan Willcocks’ published music includes major choral works, music for children’s choir, many shorter pieces (including anthems and secular choral music), orchestral and instrumental works. Jonathan’s has many recordings, and his music is frequently performed and broadcast in many parts of the world.

Jonathan is currently Musical Director of the Guildford Choral Society, the Chichester Singers, the Leith Hill Musical Festival and the professional chamber orchestra Southern Pro Musica.

For a full biography of Jonathan, please visit http://www.jonathanwillcocks.com.


Chichester Music Society Autumn Programme

I am delighted to announce that CMS is proposing to run our Autumn Season as planned, including an additional event on Tuesday 29th September. The University recently informed us that the Chapel, our usual performance space, would be available and that the University is intending to live-stream all events. The Chapel lends itself to social distancing so we are hoping that by the Autumn there will be an audience present. In any event, we intend to go ahead with or without an audience, depending on Government guidelines. Further details will be made available in due course.

This is an excellent outcome for CMS as it means that members and friends who felt anxious could watch from home, or everyone could if only small audiences were allowed in the performance space at first.

In my last CMS Update I announced that we had re-arrange the lecture/recital with Ashworth & Rattenbury Guitars to Tuesday 29th September. Unfortunately due to changes in their tour planning the duo are not able to come on that occasion and we will be seeing them next year. However, I am delighted to be able to confirm that Erin Alexander who was due to give our Summer Buffet Concert on 10th June will now be performing on that date. Further details of our first two Autumn events are shown below.

Finally, do take a look at our updated website! We are in the process of making the site consistent with our new CMS image and at the same time introducing new areas which we hope will be of interest to old and new members alike. Please let me have your views and suggestions.

Do look after yourselves over the coming months and try to avoid any unnecessary risks!


Next event 9th September: Pavlos Carvalho, Bach Cello Suites

Pavlos Carvalho is probably best known to CMS members as the cellist with Ensemble Reza. However, he is a distinguished soloist and his recitals of the Bach Cello Suites have become something of a special feature of the Festival of Chichester. Anyone fortunate enough to attend the concerts at St John’s Chapel will need no encouragement to come and hear him at the University.

In addition to fine musicianship, when talking about these wonderful pieces he is able to add many insights which bring them to life. In an interview with Phil Hewitt which appeared in the Mid Sussex Times a few years ago, he noted that “You get into the mind frame if you play Bach. There is perhaps a difficulty particularly with the awareness of period performance, but for me, whether consciously or unconsciously, it is all about the clarity of the voicing. Even when he is writing for the cello, he is writing for different voices, and the challenge is to make the voicing clear. If you look at the score, you are faced with a barrage of notes. You have to find out which ones are of primary importance, which ones of secondary importance. The idea is to put in that hard work so the end result appears simple. But you will always see new things. You can spend your entire life trying to find out the definitive version, but you won’t. That’s both the joy and the frustration!”

This is a great opportunity to hear him in this remarkable music.

Tuesday 29th September, Erin Alexander: “On a High Note”

This concert, postponed from 10th June, will be a special event, with the return of Chichester University graduate and Award-winning soprano Erin Alexander, and pianist Nick Miller, presenting “On a High Note”, the story of soprano Graziella Sciutti. The singer was a contemporary of Maria Callas, and helped pioneer the movement of opera singers becoming actors. Erin will sing the arias by Mozart, Verdi, and Rossini which made Sciutti’s career.

Erin Alexander has recently finished studying on a full scholarship at the Conservatorio Luigi Cherubini. Whilst there she performed the roles of Despina (Cosi fan Tutte) and Rosina (Il Barbiere di Seviglia).


Great events still to come in the Virtual Festival of Chichester

Plenty of highlights remain to come as this year’s Virtual Festival of Chichester enters its fourth week.

The day’s events will be added at 7pm ready for enjoying at the traditional 7.30pm event time. Festival events will then stay online all summer.

Go to https://festivalofchichester.co.uk/virtual-festival.

Read more below.


Profile: William Waine, conductor and singer

Who have been the main influencers on your decision to pursue a career in music?

I got myself into the choir at my father’s Parish Church in Romford, Essex, at the age of six – as soon as I was allowed! Jonathan Venner, the choirmaster, has inspired great music there for over 40 years. Jonathan’s son, Matthew, was my first singing teacher and really developed me and encouraged (dragged!) me through my academic and choral interviews at Oxford. I wouldn’t have gone on and done that, or any of this, without them.

Stephen Darlington, who was then Organist and Tutor in Music at Christ Church, showed me what professional singing could be like. If William Byrd was on the music list, you’d walk into the rehearsal knowing it was going to be electrifying, even from the first bar. But he balanced these high standards with care and support. We did some amazing things at Christ Church and I just couldn’t give it all up and use the law degree I was studying for as intended…

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

I think one of the hardest things for musicians is comparing yourself with what others are doing and seeing how you measure up, but I am quite lucky in that I can usually avoid the temptation. So much of what I do is a real privilege – singing great music in amazing buildings, to lovely congregations and audiences, conducting people and sharing my enjoyment of the things I love with them, or teaching young people to appreciate great music – and knowing how lucky I am really helps with any blues.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

The choral world is sociable and engenders life-long friendships. One of the joys of “fixing” singers for NMH concerts is that I can put together teams of people I love to hang out with, let alone work with. It’s just as important to me that everyone gets on and is happy in each other’s company, as well as them being outstanding musicians. It means the singers respect and care for each other, revelling in each other’s talents and seeing the fun and joy in the whole enterprise.

Similarly, with my choral societies, I like the atmosphere to be relaxed. Having fun and loving being part of it with each other sets you well on the way to better music-making.

Which works or performances are you most proud of?

I am really proud of four performances I’ve put on recently in Chichester Cathedral – three Messiahs and one St John Passion. The first two were performed by the Cathedral’s small team of Lay Vicars, and the last two by NMH. We do them with only two or three singers and one instrumentalist on each part, with the choir stepping out to do the solos. This brings such intimacy and clarity to these works, and I think enhances its emotional impact.

In 2017 I took part in a staged production of Messiah put on by the Bristol Old Vic, directed by Tom Morris (who directed the National Theatre’s famous production of War Horse), and featuring a stellar cast of soloists and The English Concert, one of the country’s foremost baroque orchestras. I was lucky enough to be in the chorus and it is one of the most enjoyable, most fulfilling and most moving things I have been involved with. I couldn’t really believe how the concept germinated and developed from rehearsals to end product was also really enlightening.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I adore Handel: he is so skilled at pulling at the heartstrings at the right moment, and knows exactly how to manipulate the emotions of a crowd. He delivers the exact dramatic mood at exactly the required moment – think Zadok the Priest at a coronation or O Lord whose mercies numberless in his oratorio Saul. I conducted some of the Music for the Royal Fireworks last year and found it absolutely thrilling. I think most baroque music is dance music, and you can find so much joy and excitement in that.

I find music emotive in its rightful context or for an occasion, so I love singing Palestrina, Victoria and Byrd, particularly at Westminster Cathedral, and works of Vaughan Williams (such as Valiant-for-Truth) and Walton (Coronation Te Deum) that are performed less often. A treble soloist of St Paul’s nearly left me in tears with his top B flat at the end of MacMillan’s Christus Vincit. I am also doing a lot of Alec Roth at the moment – his music is exuberant and playful, yet profound.

Which works do you think you perform best?

As a singer I think I am built for renaissance polyphony, particularly at lower pitches so I can sing all the high notes the sopranos usually get. The men’s voices CD we recorded in Chichester was such fun.

As a conductor I actually get most of out my evensongs with the Chichester Cathedral Voluntary Choir. I love taking staples of the repertoire like Brewer in D and trying to draw out something fresh and emotionally interesting, even in more functional music.

What is your most memorable concert experience?

When I was a child my mother and I would go to St Paul’s Cathedral on Good Friday, sit under the dome and hear Allegri’s Miserere drifting down from the Whispering Gallery during Matins. For me to sing that piece in that building at that service last year was something I would never have imagined.

In 2019 I took part in a performance of Earthrise (more Alec Roth) in Salisbury Cathedral, part of the Salisbury International Arts Festival. Everyone started in the cloisters and were gathered together by the choir singing Te lucis ante terminum (“Before the ending of the day”) by Thomas Tallis. We moved into the Cathedral, where the light from Gaia, a vast, detailed illuminated sculpture of Earth by Luke Jerram, was reflected in the baptismal font, and sang Alec’s piece about the havoc humans are wreaking on the earth. It was all quite something. Here is a link to some images.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

No matter where you think you should be, or how well you think you should be doing; for all the auditions and pressures and anxieties; always remember that you do it because you love breathing life into the notes on the page, and sharing that love with the people who come to hear you.

How would you define success as a musician/composer?

If you are happy in the work that you are doing and it brings you joy, then you’re successful.

Support for the arts

Arts and choral music in Britain faces a really uncertain future at the moment. We were in a bit of a funding crisis even before coronavirus struck. Think about how important it is to you and do something to make sure it comes back stronger. It could be joining a choral society or choir, not getting a refund for cancelled concerts, or donating money to a venue, ensemble or charity. Just don’t take it for granted.

William Waine began singing at the age of six in the choir of his father’s Parish Church, before taking up a Choral Scholarship to Christ Church, Oxford. William sang with the world-famous Cathedral Choir on Gramophone Award-nominated recordings, and tours to the USA and China. Since 2017, after spells in the choirs of Gloucester and Chichester Cathedrals, he has been based in London, working with various ensembles including the choirs of Westminster and St Paul’s Cathedrals; The Erebus Ensemble; The Hanover Band; and The English Concert. As a soloist he has appeared across the UK; live on BBC Radio Three; and as far afield as Sydney, Australia and Christchurch, New Zealand.

He founded and manages NMH with whom he performs regularly in Chichester; is the founding Musical Director of the Chichester Cathedral Voluntary Choir; and the Musical Director of Cantemus based in Havant. He teaches singing at Ditcham Park School in Petersfield and Streatham & Clapham Prep School.


Profile: David Russell, composer, singer and pianist

Who have been the main influencers on your decision to spend so much time in musical activity?

I come from a musical family: both my parents played the piano (though my father learnt to play by ear in the “knees up Mother Brown” style!); I have a twin brother who played violin and a sister who played recorder and then clarinet – I chose the piano since it was in the one room which had heating. I was fortunate to be the only student studying music at A-level so obtained 1:1 tuition.

When I moved to Chichester, I quickly joined the Chichester Singers, where I met my wife Judith. We both are still proudly singing with the choir. She also persuaded me to join CAOS – the Chichester Amateur Operatic Society, where I enjoyed lead roles, initially in Gilbert & Sullivan operettas and then later in classic musicals, such as Oklahoma and Annie Get Your Gun.

I had started writing songs with my original landlord, Norman Barrett, who was a singer at the Selsey holiday camps in his spare time. We continued to spend many years composing songs, sometimes of a religious nature, sometimes pop ballads – and after he died, and I retired, I’ve concentrated on 4-part choral pieces, including entering Christmas Carols in the BBC Radio 3 annual competition.

About 14 years ago I was lucky enough to join Chichester Voices (CV), a 20 strong chamber choir. Their MD Andrew Naylor has been incredibly supportive in encouraging performances of my compositions, and I still sing bass with them. As my twin conducts a choir in Keyworth, Nottingham, I also have an outlet in the Midlands for my pieces!

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

My biggest musical challenge was probably as MD of CAOS in the 1980s directing The Mikado in the Minerva Theatre. It came as bit of a shock trying to conduct an orchestra when the performer on stage decides to sing at their own tempo, or pauses suddenly in the middle of a patter song!

Many years later the Corpus Christi Amateur Dramatic Society (CCADS) put on the first production of Aspects of Love outside London at the New Theatre Royal in Portsmouth, and I was MD. Although this was to great acclaim, it was jolly hard work to accommodate one of the quite edgy 7/4-time Lloyd Webber choruses, and then play one of the 2-piano parts for the week of the show.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

Collaboration for me started at an early age, where I’d play piano and violin sonatas with my brother Colin. It gives great pleasure to appreciate the nuances of accompanying or playing a duet, and piano duets with friends remain a great delight. Over the years I’ve come to appreciate more and more the supporting role of the accompanist, whether for a singer or instrumentalist, and particularly treasure the time in rehearsal preparing for a recital. It’s great to share the innate musicality of performing with musicians of high calibre.

I’ve enjoyed singing with Cavatina, an a cappella 4-part group, based in Barnham. We singers are wonderfully exposed, but there’s a spine-tingling impact when it all comes together.

I’ve partnered up with David Bathurst to tell the story of Flanders and Swan, impersonating Donald Swann at the piano, which has engendered so many laughs, and some vivid memories for audience members who saw them live! At the other end of the spectrum, performing a piece like Verdi’s Requiem with a large choir and orchestra is all-encompassing and emotionally rewarding.

How would you describe your musical language?

I describe them as melody-driven ballads, many of which have had orchestral arrangements added by Tony Pegler, a close friend and superb musician. My religious music compositions are in a modern style, not too far removed from John Rutter.

How do you work?

I sit at the piano with a laptop nearby with composing software on it. I’ve just completed a setting of The Silver Swan (originally by Orlando Gibbons) and an Ubi Caritas in 4-part SATB for CV.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

I wrote a 4-part anthem for my daughter Lizzie’s wedding entitled My True Love Hath my Heart which was a joy and privilege.

I’ve arranged songs such as Céline Dion’s All By Myself and Jerome Kern’s The Way You Look Tonight for my a cappella group.

With CAOS I’ve most enjoyed acting as Eisenstein, in Die Fledermaus, and as Jud Fry in Oklahoma, both in the Minerva Theatre.

I’ve been the bass soloist in Fauré’s Requiem with the Chichester Singers at a singing day, and performed the role of the Captain of the Pinafore in a staged concert of HMS Pinafore in Chichester Cathedral, under the legendary Kenneth Alwyn.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I have a particular love for (late) Romantic composers such as Brahms, Mahler and Elgar (particularly his The Dream of Gerontius), but also love contemporary choral music by composers such as Whitacre and Lauridsen.

Which works do you think you perform best?

The comic songs with David Bathurst telling the story of Flanders and Swan: I seem to excel when good comic timing is needed, and I can just about manage the tongue-twisters of Tom Lehrer, such as Poisoning Pigeons in the Park.

What is your most memorable concert experience?

Singing A Great and Glorious Victory by Jonathan Willcocks in a Martin Luther King Jr. Day concert with a selection of singers from the Chichester Singers and in Carnegie Hall, New York in 2013. It was amazing to stand on the same stage where the Beatles performed and where Tchaikovsky had conducted the inaugural concert.

Singing The Dream of Gerontius with the Chichester Singers and Dame Janet Baker in Chichester Cathedral.

Watching La Traviata in Sydney Opera House during a trip to New Zealand and Australia.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

It’s not a career that is well rewarded financially, unless you are extremely talented (or lucky), but it is one that’s well rewarded emotionally. And music engenders close friendships: you drop your guard, wear your heart on your sleeve, and openly acknowledge to the others in your group what the whole experience is doing to you. If you choose a separate, enjoyable career, then non-professional music-making can be nearly as fulfilling, in my experience, and probably less stressful!

How would you define success as a musician/composer?

It’s important for there to be mutual respect among peers. It’s also vital to be able to communicate with the audience – happiness is contagious. Finally, live events cannot be replicated by virtual performances, so do support the former when it becomes possible again.

How are you keeping yourself usefully occupied and sane during lockdown?

I’ve been busier than ever: I’ve written 4 pieces since the middle of March. But I am missing the special pleasure of group choral singing….

Where would you like to be in 10 years’ time?

Still writing, playing and singing. In Chichester!

What is your idea of perfect happiness?

Sharing the music that I love, either as a performer or listener. It gives me great personal pleasure to know that, for example, my brother might be performing a Verdi Requiem in Nottingham on the same evening as my sister in York and myself in Chichester! Similarly, I have a happy memory of seeing my daughter and her husband performing Elijah in the Barbican – 30 years after my wife Judith and I performed it as a young married couple. Family music-making, as family itself, is so important to me.

What is your most treasured possession?

My refurbished Rogers upright piano from 1929 which was a wedding present to Judith and myself from Judith’s mother.

What do you enjoy doing most?

Composing and singing, playing golf and croquet, spending time with our grandchildren, and enjoying wine – including on monthly Monday afternoons with the U3A Wine Appreciation Group, now I’ve stepped into the unseen world of retirement!

What is your present state of mind?

Happy, and in a good position to remind myself how lucky I am. I feel that I’m still able to make the most of the opportunities I am presented with and I’m looking forward to again enjoying the camaraderie of choral singing – and hugging the grandchildren.

Things I would like to recommend

Concerts for the Singers and Voices are in abeyance at present but please check out recent lockdown performances on YouTube, such as by The Chichester Singers.

Theatre companies have been dreadfully affected by the current crisis, so I would urge you to help support local groups, if possible, again by checking websites of CCADS and the Chichester Festival Theatre, amongst others. These groups have released videos of popular productions for free to air viewing.

David Russell lives in Fishbourne and is a retired Chartered Surveyor who has spent as much of his spare time as possible in non-professional music-making. He is a composer and pianist and is a Life Member of CAOS Musical Productions; he has sung with Chichester Singers for over 40 years and with Chichester Voices for nearly 15; is a member of Cavatina, and is currently Musical Director of Just Us – a concert party performing treasured memories from shows and musical comedy for Care Homes and Charities.


Profile: Lynden Cranham, cellist

Who have been the main influencers on your decision to pursue a career in music?

There is a long tradition of music-making on both sides of my family (there have been numbers of organists, pianists and singers). Indeed, music was such an integral part of my home life that I seem to have inherited these influencers and their traditions: I can’t actually remember ever making a decision to become a musician.

Some of my earliest memories are of my grandmother and great aunt playing the piano or singing (they’d both studied at the Royal College of Music), and of my father playing the piano. He took me when I was very young to organ recitals at Westminster Cathedral (the sounds, seeming to come down from the darkened upper part of the building, were so atmospheric), and my great aunt and I went to Sir Malcolm Sargent’s Messiah performances at the Royal Albert Hall.

I sang a lot as a child and started piano lessons around the age of 5, so might well have followed in that family tradition; but on one of our daily family afternoons in Richmond Park we met, quite by chance, a lady called Julia Pringle. She offered to teach me the cello and I became her first pupil. I owe a great deal to this kind and nurturing musician. Had this meeting not occurred I doubt that I would have started to play the instrument that has defined my musical life; and then, sometime later, had I not played the cello, I would certainly not have met the musician friend who introduced me to my future husband; our children and grandchildren would not have existed!

Later on I was lucky to study with further inspirational teachers: Jennifer Ward Clarke at the Junior Royal College; Milly Stanfield at the International Cello Centre (established to propagate the teachings of Pablo Casals); Douglas Cameron at the Royal Academy of Music; and Maurice Eisenberg at the Cello Centre, in Portugal and in New York.

I’ve always loved playing chamber music, and after my studies at the Royal Academy was a member of the Burnell Piano Trio, which broadcast and gave a large number of concerts in Britain and Europe. During this time I also played in the London Mozart Players and made numbers of commercial recordings.

I increasingly became influenced by colleagues who were switching from “modern” to “historical” performance practice. I found that playing music of the eighteenth century and earlier in this fashion was musically and intellectually satisfying. Just after I made this switch I moved to the US with my husband and very young children, and we lived in Ithaca, New York. I taught at Cornell University and was a member of the Accordo Perfetto Piano Quartet, which toured the US and New Zealand. But I also continued to play baroque cello there, with colleagues such as Sonia Monosoff and Malcolm Bilson, and frequently came back to England to record and tour with Christopher Hogwood and the Academy of Ancient Music.

Chris Hogwood was one of the people who were influencing this whole revolution in music-making, and on my return to live in England I worked regularly with him and others, such as John Eliot Gardiner and his three ensembles, and Frans Brüggen, William Christie, Simon Rattle and many others with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. With these and other period instrument ensembles, I’ve made many recordings and toured many parts of the world.

What have been the greatest challenges on your musical career of far?

As a cellist I have found that rather than the greatest challenges being musical, some of the biggest issues have been practical ones – travelling around, basically carrying another person with you and often a suitcase as well.

Rush-hour trains speak for themselves (I’ve frequently had to stand from Waterloo to Petersfield, with a book balanced on top the cello case), but some of my worst experiences have involved aircraft. Different airlines have different rules for the accommodation of cellos. Even though a seat will have been bought for the instrument the people at the check-in desks often seem not to know their company’s rules.

On an Academy of Ancient Music tour of the US one of the other cellists and I were, literally, put off a flight with our instruments as the plane was about to start taxiing. Passengers had refused to move from what were considered “safe” seats for the cellos, and we were left in the airport in New York as the rest of the orchestra and our luggage flew off to Miami. On another US tour, with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the cellos were travelling in “laundry baskets” in the hold. As we waited at the airport in Chicago it became clear that the cellos had not been put onto the flight from New York with us. The baskets were eventually found and the cellos arrived in time for the next evening’s concert!

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

Playing in large international concert spaces is of course exciting; but such spaces can inevitably feel impersonal. As a baroque cellist I particularly enjoy music-making with small groups and in more intimate venues. Collaborating with other musicians can be such an intense experience. You rehearse and travel together, and trust is built up. The results will always have an element of risk, but it is especially rewarding when the group empathy is such that a player can do something unrehearsed, on the spur of the moment, and the whole ensemble and piece stay together!

Locally I’ve given numbers of recitals with keyboard player Richard Barnes; I also play with the Parnassian Ensemble (consisting of two recorders, baroque cello and harpsichord) and the Consort of Twelve (a period instrument orchestra). As well as being continuo cellist for the Consort, I’m an active member of the committee, the orchestral librarian, and also book the players who will direct each of the concerts.

It’s a particular pleasure for me to ask old friends/colleagues such as Kati Debretzeni, Cat Mackintosh, Elizabeth Wallfisch and Julia Bishop to come down and direct. It’s also hugely satisfying to help organise and put on a concert. When we get to the concert night all the hard work is forgotten, we look out at familiar faces in the audience and it becomes a hugely enjoyable experience.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

Like many professional musicians, although I can enjoy the act of performance and sometimes feel that it has gone well, I’m also intensely self-critical: so I tend to remember the things that I’d like to have gone better. Anyway, it’s always better to look forward.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

If I’m playing “modern” cello I really enjoy playing the romantic repertoire, perhaps in particular the Brahms and Rachmaninov sonatas. On period instruments it’s been amazing to play Mahler symphonies with Roger Norrington, and again on period instruments it was marvellous to do Verdi and Berlioz with John Eliot Gardiner. On baroque instruments I love the complexities and rhythmic drive of Bach, but I think that Handel’s bass lines are wonderful. They manage to give the harmonic structure but can also seem so melodious.

Which works do you think you perform best?

Perhaps you should ask other people’s opinion of that, but I really enjoy playing continuo, whether it’s accompanying a singer or other instrumentalists.

What is your most memorable concert experience as a performer?

Every concert is memorable for so many reasons, but two quite dramatic experiences immediately come to mind. My C string broke once during the first act of an opera at Glyndebourne. I had to keep playing (although I obviously couldn’t play on that string) and the unravelled pieces kept clattering and buzzing against the body of the cello through what remained of the act, also resonating with the strings of the other cellists. I got a round of applause and lots of fascinated questions from the front row of the audience as I stood up for the dinner interval.

Another incident has stayed in my mind, especially because of the repertoire that we were performing. I took part in a number of the concerts in John Eliot Gardiner’s Bach Cantata Pilgrimage. On one occasion we arrived in St George’s Church, Eisenach, and a large wooden platform had been constructed for us. I had to play with my feet against a large font. Afterwards I discovered that it was the font in which Bach had been baptised.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Try to find a teacher you have a rapport with and who will be really honest with you. Be prepared to spend lots of time on your own, practising – if you’re a bit of a perfectionist you won’t notice the time passing. You probably won’t earn much money, but if you really love music it is a wonderful career.

How would you define success as a musician?

Every time I was about to give a performance, my first cello teacher, Julia Pringle, would always say to me, “If you enjoy yourself the audience will enjoy themselves”. When I play I feel I’ve succeeded if I’ve put the music across as well as I can, if I’ve managed to create a sense of communication between myself and the audience, and if they’ve enjoyed themselves.

How are you keeping yourself usefully occupied and sane under lockdown?

a. Along with the other concerts that have had to be cancelled, I would have been giving a recital of Bach Cello Suites on the Isle of Wight in June. I’m practising the Suites anyway: they’re amazing music and endlessly challenging.

b. A few years ago I did a PhD at Birkbeck (about music in C19 London), and I joined a C19 literature book group made up of fellow students. I would have been presenting Anthony Trollope’s “Barchester Towers” in June, so I thought I’d read the whole cycle of six Barchester Chronicles.

c. I’m teaching our 4-year-old granddaughter to read via Zoom.

d. My husband and I have been repairing the ravaged garden left by a recent building project; I mostly try to stop him mowing/chopping everything else down!

Come to a concert

The three planned Consort of Twelve concerts for 2020 have, of course, had to be cancelled. Luckily we’ve managed to reschedule these for 2021 and we will also be doing a fourth concert, which will be during the Festival of Chichester. For those who’d like to get an idea of the work of the directors of the rescheduled orchestral concerts (Simon Standage and Julia Bishop) there are numerous online examples.

13 March 2021: St Matthew Passion with the Portsmouth Choral Union, conducted by David Gostick. At 6.30pm (to be confirmed), St Mary’s Church, Portsea, PO1 5PA.
23 May 2021: Concert directed by violinist Simon Standage, entitled Two Composer Priests – Vivaldi and Bonporti. At 6.00pm, Holy Trinity Church, Bosham, PO18 8HX.
11 July 2021: In the Festival of Chichester. Israel in Egypt with the Portsmouth Baroque Choir, conducted by Malcolm Keeler. At 6.00pm, St Paul’s Church, Churchside, Chichester, PO19 6FT.
19 September 2021: Concert directed by violinist Julia Bishop, entitled Beyond the Seasons. At 6.00pm, St John’s Chapel, St John’s Street, Chichester, PO19 1UR.


Chichester Music Society’s June newsletter

This month’s edition discusses:

• Our excellent start to the year with the Navarra Quartet opening the special season celebrating the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth. Their concert was too early to appear in our new Newsletter and the press review of their outstanding performance.
• The impact of the Coronavirus pandemic on our programme. The CMS Committee held a virtual meeting on 4th May & discussed this and the effect on members subscriptions.
• This year’s Summer Buffet Concert which was to mark the launch of CMS will be postponed until June 2021.
• How we are helping to develop the musicians of the future through our bursary scheme, prizes and instrument library.

Intense Navarra!

The Navarra String Quartet opened the Funtington Music Group’s 2020 Programme with a concert at the University of Chichester on 15 January.

The concert opened with a performance of Andreas Romberg’s String Quartet Opus 59 No 2. Romberg was a contemporary of Beethoven, but his music is far from well-known, and is still based in the pre-Beethoven era. However, the piece was more than a suitable introduction to the programme which was commemorating the 250th Anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, and the audience certainly enjoyed the performance.

The Navarra, with Magnus Johnston [violin], Marije Johnston [violin], Sasha Botha [viola], and Brian O’Kane [cello], gave a highly polished interpretation, as the music rotated from the joyous introduction in the first two movements to a melancholic start of the third movement, before it moved into a more romantic phase, and concluded with the capricious finale of the fourth.

The second piece was Three Idylls by Frank Bridge. This English composer wrote the piece in 1906, as a gift to his future wife. Perhaps he was in a melancholy mood as the first two Idylls are rather dark, whereas the last is animated and lifts the entire work out of its moody introspection. The Navarra caught the spirit of the music absolutely and were particularly adept at portraying the transforming emotions from frost and winter in the first two movements, to the sun and summer of the third.

The climax of the evening was a stunning performance of Beethoven’s String Quartet in F, Opus 59, No 1 “Razumovsky”. This was a revolutionary work when first played. Passages of sublime beauty are often offset by rough hews, spectacular fiddling, tension-filled sections, and striking changes in colour and mood. The Navarra were excellent, playing with an energy and intensity where it was particularly noticeable how they listened to each other and responded effectively to the challenging development of the music.

The audience were extremely appreciative, particularly enjoying the final movement, which probably rates as one of Beethoven’s most celebrated. Chris Hough, Chairman of Funtington Music Group, said, “This was an outstanding concert and we are so grateful to the Navarra for their intense and committed playing, and particularly for commemorating Beethoven in such style and in such a memorable manner.”

Chris Linford, 16th January 2020

Chairman’s Blog

The Coronavirus continues to have a major impact on all social activities, especially the performing arts. We unfortunately had to cancel the Student Showcase Competition on 15th April and have made an award to all finalists due to appear. The recital by Ashworth & Rattenbury Guitars has been postponed until 29th September. We are postponing our special CMS launch event due to take place on 10th June until 9th June 2021.

We are hopeful that our programme will resume after the summer break. If this is not possible we will try wherever we can to postpone and re-arrange events to the 2021season. Members will be offered full credit for any events not taking place to be used against next year’s subscription. Further details will be announced in due course.

These are very upsetting times for all of us. We are fortunate that CMS has a strong financial position and an excellent relationship with the University of Chichester which should help us to weather this unprecedented storm and continue our contribution to the musical life of the City.

Do take care and look after yourselves. I look forward to seeing you all again soon!

Charity and Bursary News

Last year seven students received bursary awards to help them pursue post-graduate musical studies and we are currently in the process of purchasing two natural trumpets for the University Chamber Orchestra.

Rachael Ford is a recent recipient of a CMS bursary. She thanks all Society members who contribute to the bursary scheme explaining that: “I am currently halfway through a two-year Masters in Instrumental Performance at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire specialising on cornet. I am being taught under two of the finest cornet players, Richard Marshall, who is currently principal cornet of the world-famous Black Dyke Band, and Ian Porthouse, who is an award-winning cornet player and also professional conductor conducting one of the most successful bands, Tredegar Band.

“This postgraduate course has enabled me to receive specialist tuition from leading UK and internationally-renowned performers, including cornet soloist and principal trumpet of the London Symphonic Orchestra, Philip Cobb. Not only do I have frequent opportunities to perform, including performance classes and Brass Band concerts, but I also have chances to take modules which allow me to concentrate on aspects of becoming a professional musician. These include the ‘Career Development’ module, which allowed me to reflect ambitiously yet realistically on my professional aspirations, and, additional ‘Professional Development’ Options, including the ‘Self-promotion project’ and ‘Professional Music Criticism’.

“I am grateful for these generous bursary awards from the Chichester Music Society which have helped significantly to assist me through my Masters course. These bursary awards will significantly assist me to enrich my musical career aspirations of being a professional musician. It has given me the opportunity to work with top-level musicians, with the exposure to professional views through individual tuition and masterclasses with distinguished visiting guest musicians.”

The newsletter’s must-reads, recommended listens, local musical events

Local events continue to be severely disrupted by Covid19. This year’s Summer Buffet Concert on 10th June marking the launch of CMS has had to be cancelled. Next year’s Summer Buffet Concert on 9th June will be a special event providing an opportunity to celebrate the launch of CMS, so put it in your diary! We hope to present Erin Alexander and Nick Miller in their special show during the year.

Autumn Season

We are hoping to run our Autumn season as planned. Our first event on 9th September features Pavlos Carvalho discussing and playing Bach’s Cello suites (details below).

As previously announced, the programme by Ashworth & Rattenbury Guitars, due to take place on 13th May, has been postponed until Tuesday 29th September 2020. This concert will feature duets performed on three types of instrument: the Baroque guitar, the Early Romantic guitar, and the modern classical guitar.

In October, Angela Zanders will be continuing our Beethoven theme with an examination of his life and place in the history of Western music. This year’s Christmas Special on 9th December with David Owen Norris discussing Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata should also be firmly in everyone’s diary!

As noted above, if we are not able to present our events as planned, wherever possible they will be postponed until next year.

Next event: 9th September – Pavlos Carvalho, Bach Cello Suites

Pavlos Carvalho is probably best known to CMS members as the cellist with Ensemble Reza. However, he is a distinguished soloist and his recitals of the Bach Cello Suites have become something of a special feature of the Festival of Chichester. Anyone fortunate enough to attend the concerts at St John’s Chapel will need no encouragement to come and hear him at the University.

In addition to fine musicianship, when talking about these wonderful pieces he is able to add many insights which bring them to life. In an interview with Phil Hewitt which appeared in the Mid Sussex Times a few years ago, he noted that “You get into the mind frame if you play Bach. There is perhaps a difficulty particularly with the awareness of period performance, but for me, whether consciously or unconsciously, it is all about the clarity of the voicing. Even when he is writing for the cello, he is writing for different voices, and the challenge is to make the voicing clear. If you look at the score, you are faced with a barrage of notes. You have to find out which ones are of primary importance, which ones of secondary importance. The idea is to put in that hard work so the end result appears simple. But you will always see new things. You can spend your entire life trying to find out the definitive version, but you won’t. That’s both the joy and the frustration!”

This is a great opportunity to hear him in this remarkable music.

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Profile: Angela Zanders, pianist and lecturer

Angela Zanders was born in London and started piano lessons with her father, New Zealand pianist, Douglas Zanders. She went on to study at The Purcell School, Trinity College of Music and Goldsmiths’ College, University of London. She also won an Austrian Government Scholarship for study at the Hochschule für Musik, Vienna. At Trinity College, where she studied with Joseph Weingarten, Angela won many competitions and awards. She later studied chamber music with Murray Perahia, William Pleeth and Raphael Wallfisch.

Angela has performed all over the UK, including venues such as London’s Wigmore Hall, South Bank, St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields and at St. David’s Hall in Cardiff. She has broadcast for BBC Radio 3 and has given performances throughout Europe and in Australia and New Zealand, both as soloist and accompanist and as pianist in the Solarek Piano Trio, which she formed in 1992. For ten years Angela was accompanist at the Centre for Young Musicians in London. She does a great deal of freelance accompanying and has worked with many internationally acclaimed singers and instrumentalists.

Angela has a special interest in promoting the accessibility of classical music and has been giving lecture recitals for many years. She has lectured in Music Appreciation for Birkbeck College, University of London and for the WEA and U3A in Hampshire and currently runs her own classes in Music Appreciation in Hampshire and West Sussex.

Angela has been a lecturer at the University of Chichester since 2010 and is an adjudicator for The British and International Federation of Festivals.

www.angelazanders.com

Simon O’Hea is in conversation with Angela.

Who or what were the main influences on your decision to pursue a career in music?

I grew up in a house where my father taught up to 100 piano pupils each week. He was a wonderful musician and a great teacher and my mother, although an artist, was also very musical, so growing up with music happened naturally and there was never a point when I made the decision as such. A turning point was being sent to study piano with Vera Yelverton when I was 13 and two years later attending The Purcell School.

Who or what are the most important influences on your musical life?

Without doubt, my father, Douglas Zanders; my wonderful teacher, the Hungarian pianist Joseph Weingarten whom I studied with at Trinity College of Music, and the international concert pianist Murray Perahia. I was completely bowled over by his playing when he won first prize at the Leeds International Piano Competition – shortly afterwards I met him and was struck by his genuine humility, total lack of self-regard, kindness and willingness to offer help and support where needed. I was privileged to get to know him and to be given lessons and mentoring and it is true to say that the example of his playing and his approach to life and to music has been a major influence on my life.

What have been the greatest challenges of your career so far?

Remembering to believe in myself is definitely one. The music profession is incredibly high-powered and competitive, and it is easy to feel that one is battling against the tide. But, over the years, I have learnt to cultivate my particular strengths based on what I am passionate about, which is studying and researching every aspect of a piece of music and sharing this with others through performing, lecturing and teaching. The pleasure and fulfilment I get from this is immeasurable, and if just one person enjoys listening to music more as a result, I know it has been worthwhile!

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

One of my great pleasures is in playing chamber music. Being a pianist means working largely on one’s own, but if I am rehearsing or performing a chamber work I love with others I have a personal and musical rapport with, I am in my element. Listening to and trying out other musicians’ ideas on interpretation helps broaden one’s thinking and gives insights one might not have otherwise discovered. One of the main challenges is finding rehearsal times to suit all!

How would you describe your musical language?

I would describe my musical language as always trying to tell a story with the music. I like to draw people into the music I perform and I am always eager to share some background to the music with my audiences.

How do you work? 

In studying a new work I want to find out everything I can about the music, the composer and when he or she composed it, the influences behind it and, as far as possible, to ‘get inside the composer’s head’. Every piece of music tells some sort of a story and I love the process of discovering what that story is about – through the composer’s directions, the harmonies, the tonality etc. and in trying to find out how and why the composer wrote the piece in the first place.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

Ever since I was a child, I have adored Mozart’s final piano concerto in B flat major K595. I finally performed it a few years ago and it was a dream fulfilled. I was also proud to be able to give a lecture recital on Schubert’s Trout Quintet ending with a complete performance of the work with some wonderful musicians for the Petersfield Musical Festival a few years ago.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I have always adored Beethoven. I studied music at the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna and living for a year in the city where Beethoven (and Haydn, Mozart and Schubert) lived and worked was overwhelming – an experience which has shaped my whole approach to their music.

Which works do you think you perform best?

This is difficult to judge but I would say probably Beethoven and Schubert.

What is your most memorable concert experience – either as a performer/composer or listener?

Hearing the Lindsay String Quartet perform all the Beethoven quartets at the Wigmore Hall was an unforgettable experience, as was hearing Murray Perahia play all Chopin’s Preludes many years ago. Everyone was electrified. I also heard Horowitz play live – the most astonishing moment was when he played the National Anthem. I have never heard anyone play like that before or since. Such extraordinary power and authority coming from such a slight figure.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Only take up music as a career if you can’t live without it. If you’ve got something to say in music, believe in this and never allow yourself to be put down by people who say you can’t do it or that you’re not as good as the next person.

How would you define success as a musician/composer?

Being true to yourself, working hard and communicating through music.

What do you enjoy doing most?

Being with my son, being with my friends and colleagues and the process of communicating my passion for music to others in my recitals, lectures and classes.

Angela is holding a series of three lecture recitals entitled “Beethoven Enlightened” to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, exploring the significance of Beethoven in Western music. With complete performances of some of Beethoven’s most significant piano and chamber music including ‘Moonlight’ Piano Sonata, ‘Kreutzer’ Sonata for violin and piano, Trio in B Flat Op. 11 for clarinet, piano and cello.

Angela Zanders (piano) with Rob Blanken (clarinet), Catherine Lett (violin) and Mikhail Lezdkan (cello).

12 September, 3 October and 7 November 2020 at 3pm. See Beethoven Enlightened.

Also see Music appreciation course with Angela Zanders: “Classical Masterpieces Composed in Troubled Times”.


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