For the latest amateur classical music listings in and around Portsmouth, including Fareham, Petersfield, Chichester, Havant and Hayling Island

Support for musicians and the musical community during the pandemic

Established in early 2017, Music in Portsmouth offers classical musicians a voice in the local community. It enjoys around 1,000 unique visits and 3,000 page views per month.

During the current crisis I am:

• Writing profiles of local musicians – whether they be composers, conductors or performers*
• Sharing videos and audio clips, including video-casts and live-streamed concerts – the concert venues are closed but the music goes on
• Sharing articles and other resources which may be of interest.

If you hear of anything you’d like me to share, or if you would like me to write a profile of you, please contact me or message me via Twitter to submit material for inclusion.

Meanwhile, stay well everyone and let’s keep in touch.

* Read about:
Brian Moles
George Burrows
Neil Sands
Philip Drew
Stefanie Read
Susan Yarnall-Monks
Alex Poulton
Stewart Collins
Catherine Lawlor
Crispin Ward
Clive Osgood
Jack Davies
Vincent Iyengar
Jonathan Willcocks
Susan Legg
Lucy Humphris
Nik Knight
Andrew Cleary
Steve Venn
Cathy Mathews
David Price
William Waine
Stella Scott
David Russell
Peter Gambie
Lynden Cranham
Ben Lathbury
Valentina Seferinova
Ann Pinhey
Geoff Porter
Tim Fisher
Terry Barfoot
Angela Zanders
Peter Best
Colin Jagger
Ian Schofield
Matthew Coleridge
Nicola Benedetti
Beryl Francis
Alex Poulton
David Gostick
Stuart Reed
Lucy Armstrong
Roy Theaker
Julia Bishop
Anne White
Wayne Mayor
Stefano Boccacci
Ben Lathbury
Jake Barlow
Penny Gordon
Antonia Kent
John Elder
Simon Wilkins


Petersfield Orchestra meets again

Piers Burton-Page reports from the cello section

‘Lockdown’ has just been awarded the accolade of Word of the Year by Collins Dictionaries – an honour it could perhaps well do without. We have probably all had enough of its impact, as well as of the word itself. Over the course of 2020, Petersfield Orchestra has lost not one but three concerts: depriving us of welcome exposure, and most especially, of the joy of communal music-making. Concerts are after all why we exist! So the news that Petersfield Musical Festival, of which Petersfield Orchestra is such an integral part, is determined to go ahead in 2021 is very welcome.

Not that our musicians have been totally silent: from September onwards we began to rehearse in the Assembly Hall at The Petersfield School – socially distanced, one player per desk, strings only, all doors wide open (brrrr!), with a view to a possible COVID compliant-concert before Christmas. Alas, the second lockdown – that word again – has put paid to that project, for this year anyway. It’s been back to practising on our own – with a slight feeling of resentment that the rules seem to be so different for the likes of professional footballers or people who race Formula One cars . . . while professional musicians now find their livelihoods threatened, to the point of possible extinction.

But Government restrictions permitting, Petersfield Orchestra will be there, playing – a rather different programme to the one we originally planned. Certainly the chosen repertoire will be subject to many constraints. I think I’d put my money on Haydn and Mozart, maybe with some Baroque gems, and perhaps with a concerto of some kind just to leaven the texture.

Small is beautiful: we need to leave room for an audience! If the event can be streamed online for a while, so that all our friends – and Festival Friends and Orchestra Friends – can hear us in action, then so much the better for everyone concerned. Goodbye ‘Lockdown’ – we hope!


Petersfield Musical Festival Newsletter Autumn 2020

It’s been the toughest year on record for musicians, with professionals deprived of their livelihoods and amateurs unable to take part in the groups and activities they love.

The Festival was stopped in its tracks by the March lockdown and lost its planned Choral Workshop in September. However, planning for 2021 continues, though necessarily on a smaller scale than usual.

Meanwhile, individuals and groups have found enterprising ways to keep singing and playing – whether online, outdoors, or socially distanced under strict conditions.

Our autumn Newsletter reports on the Festival’s online AGM, and brings stories from local singers and instrumentalists about how they have succeeded in making and sharing music under lockdown,

Read the full newsletter: 46 Petersfield Musical Festival Newsletter_33_Autumn_2020_colour

If you would like to support professional musicians by contributing to Help Musicians (formerly The Musicians Benevolent Fund) please click here.

 


Petersfield Orchestra “stringing along”

Anyone passing Petersfield School in Cranford Road last Friday evening would not just have felt the first chill of autumn in the air, they would have heard it, too. For the sounds of Autumn, one of Vivaldi’s famous violin concertos called the Four Seasons, were ringing out loud and clear from the Assembly Hall. After an unprecedented six-month break caused by the coronavirus pandemic, Petersfield Orchestra is back in action: if not quite in full swing, then at least, and at last, allowed to rehearse.

Conductor Robin Browning praised his players for returning. “We know that the arts sector has been one of the hardest hit, in terms of morale as well as money. But we were all desperate to play the music we love. So it’s just great to be back!”

Socially distanced – no sharing of music stands – and taking every precaution – string players only, no-one blowing flutes, clarinets, oboes, bassoons or even their own trumpets – around 20 members duly assembled. Orchestra Chair Steve Bartholomew was pleased with the turnout and with the new venue. “I was not sure how many would be willing to come, especially as it is the start of a new season, with some people shielding, retired or having moved on. There is always room for new players – especially violas! And we were in a new hall: temporarily at least, as our usual home, The Avenue Pavilion which isn’t big enough to allow for distancing. I was thankful that Petersfield School could find room for us – a happy reminder that the Orchestra forms a real part of the local community.”

For the moment, no actual concerts can figure in the diary. But everyone hopes that performances as well as rehearsals will soon be possible, perhaps even before Christmas. With luck, Vivaldi’s Four Seasons along with much else will soon be entertaining Petersfield Orchestra’s loyal local following once again.

Any string players interested in joining should write to mail@petersfieldorchestra.org.uk.


Petersfield Orchestra: Inside the Band!

Find out how an orchestra works and plays together and even how it thinks! Is it a harmonious collective? How do the individual strands mesh? Join Piers, Robin & some special guests from inside Petersfield Orchestra.

Watch via the link below.


Petersfield Orchestra: Robin Browning and Piers Burton-Page on Beethoven

Piers & Robin from Petersfield Orchestra delve into the life and works of one of the greatest composers in this, Beethoven’s birthday year.

Join the discussion All about Beethoven today (Friday 12 June) at 7.30pm by clicking the link below, where they’ll try to answer questions such as “Why do the even numbered symphonies get such a bad rap?” and “why are the violins where the cellos used to be?” Bring your sketchbooks, ear-trumpets and a large glass of wine – see you then!

You can join them either on the night or catch-up later (the video will remain on the website).

You don’t need to be a member of Facebook, just click on the link below and it will take you straight there. Towards the end of their discussion they will respond to some of the comments from you, the audience. Please, join them for a lively debate!

Click the link at the bottom of this notice at 7.30pm, or afterwards.

 


Petersfield Orchestra: Robin Browning and Piers Burton-Page on the Concerto

Robin and Piers will be holding the third in their series of weekly discussions this Friday evening (5 June) at 7.30pm. This week it’s all about one of the key components in any programme: the concerto. Joined by special guest – pianist Valentina Seferinova – they’ll explore the role of the conductor and orchestra, discuss some favourite pieces and top soloists, and investigate how soloist and orchestra navigate the subtle terrain of some of the most challenging works in the repertoire.

Last week’s event drew a number of interesting comments, which may be viewed here.

You are invited to join them – on the night or catch-up later (the video will remain on the website).

You don’t need to be a member of Facebook, just click on the link below and it will take you straight there. Towards the end of their discussion they will respond to some of the comments from you, the audience. Please, join them for a lively debate!

Click the link at the bottom of this notice at 7.30pm, or afterwards.

 

 


Profile: Angela Zanders, pianist and lecturer

Angela Zanders was born in London and started piano lessons with her father, New Zealand pianist, Douglas Zanders. She went on to study at The Purcell School, Trinity College of Music and Goldsmiths’ College, University of London. She also won an Austrian Government Scholarship for study at the Hochschule für Musik, Vienna. At Trinity College, where she studied with Joseph Weingarten, Angela won many competitions and awards. She later studied chamber music with Murray Perahia, William Pleeth and Raphael Wallfisch.

Angela has performed all over the UK, including venues such as London’s Wigmore Hall, South Bank, St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields and at St. David’s Hall in Cardiff. She has broadcast for BBC Radio 3 and has given performances throughout Europe and in Australia and New Zealand, both as soloist and accompanist and as pianist in the Solarek Piano Trio, which she formed in 1992. For ten years Angela was accompanist at the Centre for Young Musicians in London. She does a great deal of freelance accompanying and has worked with many internationally acclaimed singers and instrumentalists.

Angela has a special interest in promoting the accessibility of classical music and has been giving lecture recitals for many years. She has lectured in Music Appreciation for Birkbeck College, University of London and for the WEA and U3A in Hampshire and currently runs her own classes in Music Appreciation in Hampshire and West Sussex.

Angela has been a lecturer at the University of Chichester since 2010 and is an adjudicator for The British and International Federation of Festivals.

www.angelazanders.com

Simon O’Hea is in conversation with Angela.

Who or what were the main influences on your decision to pursue a career in music?

I grew up in a house where my father taught up to 100 piano pupils each week. He was a wonderful musician and a great teacher and my mother, although an artist, was also very musical, so growing up with music happened naturally and there was never a point when I made the decision as such. A turning point was being sent to study piano with Vera Yelverton when I was 13 and two years later attending The Purcell School.

Who or what are the most important influences on your musical life?

Without doubt, my father, Douglas Zanders; my wonderful teacher, the Hungarian pianist Joseph Weingarten whom I studied with at Trinity College of Music, and the international concert pianist Murray Perahia. I was completely bowled over by his playing when he won first prize at the Leeds International Piano Competition – shortly afterwards I met him and was struck by his genuine humility, total lack of self-regard, kindness and willingness to offer help and support where needed. I was privileged to get to know him and to be given lessons and mentoring and it is true to say that the example of his playing and his approach to life and to music has been a major influence on my life.

What have been the greatest challenges of your career so far?

Remembering to believe in myself is definitely one. The music profession is incredibly high-powered and competitive, and it is easy to feel that one is battling against the tide. But, over the years, I have learnt to cultivate my particular strengths based on what I am passionate about, which is studying and researching every aspect of a piece of music and sharing this with others through performing, lecturing and teaching. The pleasure and fulfilment I get from this is immeasurable, and if just one person enjoys listening to music more as a result, I know it has been worthwhile!

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

One of my great pleasures is in playing chamber music. Being a pianist means working largely on one’s own, but if I am rehearsing or performing a chamber work I love with others I have a personal and musical rapport with, I am in my element. Listening to and trying out other musicians’ ideas on interpretation helps broaden one’s thinking and gives insights one might not have otherwise discovered. One of the main challenges is finding rehearsal times to suit all!

How would you describe your musical language?

I would describe my musical language as always trying to tell a story with the music. I like to draw people into the music I perform and I am always eager to share some background to the music with my audiences.

How do you work? 

In studying a new work I want to find out everything I can about the music, the composer and when he or she composed it, the influences behind it and, as far as possible, to ‘get inside the composer’s head’. Every piece of music tells some sort of a story and I love the process of discovering what that story is about – through the composer’s directions, the harmonies, the tonality etc. and in trying to find out how and why the composer wrote the piece in the first place.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

Ever since I was a child, I have adored Mozart’s final piano concerto in B flat major K595. I finally performed it a few years ago and it was a dream fulfilled. I was also proud to be able to give a lecture recital on Schubert’s Trout Quintet ending with a complete performance of the work with some wonderful musicians for the Petersfield Musical Festival a few years ago.

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I have always adored Beethoven. I studied music at the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna and living for a year in the city where Beethoven (and Haydn, Mozart and Schubert) lived and worked was overwhelming – an experience which has shaped my whole approach to their music.

Which works do you think you perform best?

This is difficult to judge but I would say probably Beethoven and Schubert.

What is your most memorable concert experience – either as a performer/composer or listener?

Hearing the Lindsay String Quartet perform all the Beethoven quartets at the Wigmore Hall was an unforgettable experience, as was hearing Murray Perahia play all Chopin’s Preludes many years ago. Everyone was electrified. I also heard Horowitz play live – the most astonishing moment was when he played the National Anthem. I have never heard anyone play like that before or since. Such extraordinary power and authority coming from such a slight figure.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Only take up music as a career if you can’t live without it. If you’ve got something to say in music, believe in this and never allow yourself to be put down by people who say you can’t do it or that you’re not as good as the next person.

How would you define success as a musician/composer?

Being true to yourself, working hard and communicating through music.

What do you enjoy doing most?

Being with my son, being with my friends and colleagues and the process of communicating my passion for music to others in my recitals, lectures and classes.

Angela is holding a series of three lecture recitals entitled “Beethoven Enlightened” to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, exploring the significance of Beethoven in Western music. With complete performances of some of Beethoven’s most significant piano and chamber music including ‘Moonlight’ Piano Sonata, ‘Kreutzer’ Sonata for violin and piano, Trio in B Flat Op. 11 for clarinet, piano and cello.

Angela Zanders (piano) with Rob Blanken (clarinet), Catherine Lett (violin) and Mikhail Lezdkan (cello).

12 September, 3 October and 7 November 2020 at 3pm. See Beethoven Enlightened.

Also see Music appreciation course with Angela Zanders: “Classical Masterpieces Composed in Troubled Times”.


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