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Profile: Clive Osgood, organist, pianist, conductor and composer

23/08/2020

Who and/or what have been the most important influences on your musical career?

I have had a number of great teachers (instrumental and at university) who have inspired my interest in music. I could not easily name them all!

Are there any composers with whom you feel a particular affinity?

I’ve always had an interest in 18th-century music, so much so that I did a Masters in Musicology specialising in that era. My favourite composer is Mozart, but as an organist Bach has to come a close second. Quite by contrast, I also admire a number of contemporary composers who have explored new ways of expressing tonal music (e.g. Pärt, Richter, Glass etc.). My music is in the classical tradition: it’s injected with elements of jazz harmony and the rhythmic vitality of Latin American music.

What have been the greatest challenges of your musical career so far?

Covid-19 has been a huge challenge to achieving a good work/life balance, as I have had to step in to home-school my two children while my wife (a nurse) goes to a stressful job.

What for you are the particular pleasures and challenges of collaborating with other musicians?

I very much enjoy playing chamber music and working with choirs. I am currently writing music based on Alice in Wonderland, in collaboration with the composer Hugh Benham. This is being recorded in September by Convivium Records and which will be released early in 2021.

How would you describe your musical language?

Tonal: I am interested in the fusion of 18th-century forms with 20th-century rhythms and harmony.

How do you work?

I often head off to my church (where I am the director of music) where I can compose without distractions. I use Sibelius and tend to work through many drafts.

Which works/performances are you most proud of?

I am particularly proud of my Sacred Choral Music album under Robert Lewis, Excelsis Choir and the London Mozart Players which was launched last year.

Which works do you think you perform best?

I am an organist, so possibly Bach.

What are your most memorable concert experiences?

I have had the opportunity of having compositions performed in a complete concert last year in the Grayshott Concerts, as well as a big performance of my music in St Paul’s and on another occasion in front of the Queen at Reed’s School, where I teach.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Be reliable and careful about treading the line between self-promotion and modesty. And only do it if you enjoy it – it’s not generally very rewarding financially.

How would you define success as a musician?

Putting the music first.

How are you keeping yourself usefully occupied and sane under lockdown?

With difficulty – I have been home-schooling!

Where would you like to be in 10 years’ time?

In good health.

What is your idea of perfect happiness?

Achieving something, then sitting back to enjoy it – finishing a composition or watching the view from the top of a hill.

What is your most treasured possession?

My photo albums (I would also be inclined to rescue my Mozart CD box set from a burning building!).

What do you enjoy doing most?

Visiting new places.

What is your present state of mind?

Not too bad considering…

Clive Osgood is a composer, accompanist, organist and music teacher living near Haslemere. He is currently Director of Music and Organist at the Parish Church of St Bartholomew’s in Haslemere, Surrey and teaches ‘A’ Level Music at Reed’s School, Cobham. He is available for tuition in Piano, Jazz Piano, Organ and music theory. Visit https://www.cliveosgood.com to find out more about him and his compositions.

Author: Simon O'Hea with Clive Osgood

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