Profile: Adrian Green, singer, teacher, composer and producer

Who and/or what have been the most important influences on your musical career?

I’ve always wanted to sing and I was fortunate that the school I went to had a strong ethos when it came to music. Choral singing was part of day-to-day life and although the school wasn’t exclusively a Christian institution, assemblies throughout my education included hymn singing and whole school performances of major classical works, from Handel’s Messiah to Mozart’s Coronation Mass and Haydn’s Creation. The School choir also worked on annual opera productions, including Mozart’s The Magic Flute and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas. All in all, I couldn’t have asked for more opportunities to sing and perform, especially given that my school wasn’t a music specialist institution.

My music and singing teachers have all helped me to discover my voice over the years and, especially in the context of choral music, my time as a scholar at Royal Holloway College with Rupert Gough was critical in preparing me to take up a Lay Clerk position at Portsmouth Cathedral, which I’ve held since 2008.

In terms of music education, I spent a gap year working in Sydney at a primary school in 2004. Whilst I decided at the time not to go into full-time teaching, this role did inspire me to continue to work in music education, specifically through administrating and delivering Portsmouth Cathedral’s singing partnership programme (2008-), Cathedral Sing. This work involves inspiring primary children to sing in classrooms and choir stalls and it continues to flourish with the support of Portsmouth Cathedral and support from many other charities and trusts.

What are the greatest challenges to being a musician?

From a career perspective, you’ve got to be good at many different things. You cannot afford to always say “no” to new things or avoid things unnecessarily. Whether it’s solo performance work, composing, music or singing teaching, choir tour management, website design, accounting, or even tidying the office, all these things are part of a musical career. They can all be done musically.

From a performance perspective, I find one of the greatest challenges is to practise humility in making music. It’s easy when you’re singing to have opinions or ideas about what you’re singing or who you’re singing with etc…, and the ability to see these ideas and drop them when they are irrelevant (they usually are!) is really important. To quote Heraclitus, “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man.” It’s the same with music and keeping this approach in mind helps me to be continually re-inspired by what I do (rather than expired!), whether it’s the first time I sing something or the thousandth time.

In summary, the challenges to being a musician are all about keeping an open mind and being present in what do you.

And what about Convivium Records?

Being a musician is about sharing music with others. When I first came to Portsmouth Cathedral in 2008, I was keenly aware of many of my friends and colleagues who were trying to establish careers in music. I’d developed an interest in recording at school and also at university where The Choir of Royal Holloway had worked with a number of top British Labels on commercial recording projects. With all of this in mind, I established Convivium Records in 2009. The aim was for this to be a self-publishing house for young artists and composers to be able to record and release music commercially. Over the past decade, Convivium Records has developed into a more traditional Label and works with both amateur and professional musicians and composers all over the world, whilst retaining a focus on the quality of production and a commitment to helping performers to share what inspires them.

Are there any composers for whom you feel a particular affinity?            

As a singer, I especially like performing Baroque and 20th Century music. Vaughan Williams is a composer who I’ve found particularly inspirational and, of course, alongside his significant compositional output, he was one of the editors of (and contributed heavily towards) The English Hymnal, which was and is a significant publication in the history of Anglican Church Music. It was initially in learning to play hymns from this publication that I taught myself to play piano.

What are your most memorable experiences as a musician?

Not so long ago I performed the tenor solos from Handel’s Messiah in a performance at Portsmouth Cathedral, directed by David Price. I first came across the work at the age of 10, when I was asked to sing some recit passages as part of a whole school production and it was during that performance that I decided I was going to be a singer. Some 20 years later, performing Comfort Ye, and Every Valley with Portsmouth Cathedral Choir, I experienced a being completely myself for a few moments and it’s in moments like these that I’m reminded why I do what I do.

What advice would you give to those who are considering a career in music?

Be adaptable and willing to try out new things. Keep an open mind. Learn to play the piano.

How would you define success as a musician?

Contentment in your life. (Not necessarily all the time, but at least some of the time!).

What’s your next event?

During term time, my next event is likely to be singing evensong at Portsmouth Cathedral, as this happens up to five evenings every week! Of course, there are concerts and events and recordings and performances too, but if you want to discover something new and different, challenge yourself to turn up for a choral service in the building. They are free of charge and the music presented is wide-ranging and generally inspiring. (Most of the evening services start at 5.45pm, but you can always find out exactly what’s on and when through the Portsmouth Cathedral website!).

About Adrian

Adrian is a tenor Lay Clerk at Portsmouth Cathedral and also performs with Convivium Singers and the Charpentier Ensemble, as well as various other groups. As a soloist, Adrian sings with choirs across the UK and, occasionally, further afield. Adrian manages Portsmouth Cathedral’s “Cathedral Sing” music education programme across Hampshire and also teaches solo singing to people of all ages and abilities, both at Portsmouth Grammar School, and privately. As the managing director of Convivium Records, Adrian oversees the day to day running of the classical Label.

Visit: https://adrian-green.co.uk
https://conviviumrecords.co.uk
https://www.planethugill.com/2017/03/balancing-commercial-and-artistic.html

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